Supporting the Local Community in Home Care

Supporting the Local Community in Home Care

Event

Everycare Winchester showed their commitment to supporting the local community by attending the Fair Oak Fete on the 30th June with a stand at the event.

Our stand attracted several visitors and we were able to communicate with many local people about the Home Care and Live-in Care services that we provide along with the employment opportunities that there are with Everycare.

Paula and Olivia were on the stand all day and managed to survive the summer heat as it was another scorching day with temperatures into the low 30’s. Paula commented: “It is great to able to talk to people in such a relaxed atmosphere, we met many friendly people and will definitely be at more events in the future”.

Everycare have already run several TechFest65 events to support the local community in the use of technology and will be running another later in the year.

Everycare Winchester enjoy supporting the local community and spreading the word about the Home Care and Live-in Care services that we supply.

Hampshire Live-in Care – Things to Consider

Hampshire Live-in Care – Things to Consider

24 Hour Care Home Care Live-in

When you get to a point where you are struggling to look after yourself at home you may be considering getting help or thinking about residential care  or Live-in care but be concerned about what choices there are and not sure how to go about finding out.

We believe at Everycare that we are willing to give you appropriate advice in making a decision about what you need. In this article we give some basic advice but you are more than welcome to give us a call on 01962 842548.

This article is assuming that you are past the point of just needing limited help which can be achieved using daily visits from a carer.

Often people believe that they can turn to relatives or neighbours but so many people are living busy lives and can help out but cannot commit to being available full-time. It can often be stressful looking after relatives or friends, especially when the person doing the caring wants to go on holiday or is being over-stretched by other responsibilities.

People often think that their only choice is to sell up and move into Residential Care but this can feel like a drastic and final move. There is not room in Residential Care to take all your belongings with you and you have to like living by other people’s rules. For some this suits them because there are other people to interact with and the home may have social events to take part in.

The majority of people, though, seem to want to have the option of staying at home as long as possible where they can live by their own rules and have people round whenever they want. This is where Live-in care comes into its own.

Those that are aware of Live-in care often look at the option of finding their own private care worker to look after them, because it can be cheaper. Under the current employment laws it is tricky using the services of a private carer because you are effectively employing them and could be responsible for tax and National Insurance and, even if you are only employing one person, you must offer them a pension scheme.

Private care workers need to have insurance to cover them in case something goes wrong, they will need to have breaks that you would have to find cover for. If the private care worker suddenly got ill you may have a problem getting cover. Private Care workers are not regulated and are therefore, not having to meet any particular standards and there is no oversight of their work.

Everycare Winchester supply Live-in care as a CQC (Care Quality Commission) regulated provider. Be aware that some organisations just introduce the Live-in Care workers and are not regulated, this still leaves you at risk of being in the position of being an employer.

We are unique in comparison to some Live-in care organisations in that we are supplying a local service where we can do hands-on management. As we have already been doing home care for 7 years we can cover Live-in carer breaks and do additional visits if required to deal with more complicated cases.

Please give us a call if you want any advice we are happy to talk to you about the service that we can supply with regard to Live-in care. We are here to help to live a fulfilled life at home for as long as possible.

Everycare do Live-in Care in Hampshire with our office based in the centre of the county in Winchester.

Can I Reduce My Risk of Getting Dementia?

Family Care Health Care Home Care

Dementia is a disease that many of us worry about getting in old age because of the affect it can have, not only on the sufferer, but the whole family. Our other worry comes from the fact that is no known cure at the moment and often there is no clear diagnosis.

With no cure and difficult diagnosis we ask ourselves is there anything I can do to reduce my chances of getting Dementia. The good news is there is things we can do but the bad news is that for many of us we are too late in life to change what we have already done!

The risk of dementia, disability and frailty will sometimes be determined by factors that can’t be changed, such as inherited conditions, injury or our early life education. But changing specific risk factors and behaviours can reduce the risk of dementia, disability and frailty for many people. These changeable factors include smoking, lack of physical activity, alcohol consumption, poor diet, being overweight and mental health.

Even if you think it is too late to change your lifestyle, think again because modifying our lifestyles at any stage can increase our chances of living healthier for longer.

Looking at the changeable factors where we can influence our health:

 Smoking

Smoking has an extremely harmful effect on the heart, lungs and blood vessels, including the blood vessels in the brain. Research shows that smokers have a 50 per cent greater chance of developing dementia than those who have never smoked, but this risk can be significantly reduced by quitting the habit.

Personally I do not get why people continue to smoke, how many times does it have to be said that it is really bad for your health and is anti-social. If you want to stop smoking it is a good idea to visit your GP. They can provide help and advice about quitting, and can refer you to an NHS Stop Smoking Service. The help is there, use it.

 Physical Activity

Being physically active is important for the health of both brain and heart, and should be something you do as part of a healthy lifestyle. Research shows that regular exercise in middle-aged or older adults can improve thinking and memory, and reduce the risk of developing dementia.

Try to be physically active for at least 30 minutes, five times a week, with a moderate-intensity activity such as brisk walking or cycling. To make a real difference you need get your heart rate up and break into a sweat.

Alcohol Consumption

The old guidance was not to drink more than the recommended levels of alcohol (those recommended levels are shown below) but this has changed in October 2015 to any alcohol consumption between the ages of 40 to 64 increases the risk of developing various forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. It is not about being teetotal but keeping alcohol consumption to a minimum, drop the glass of wine at the end of every day just have it on special occasions.
The old NHS guidelines suggest that men should not regularly drink more than 3–4 units of alcohol a day, and women should not regularly drink more than 2–3 units a day. A pint of lower-strength lager and a standard 175ml glass of wine each contain around two units of alcohol. We have left this guidance in to help people below 40 keep their consumption below sensible levels.

 Poor Diet

Poor diet can affect a person’s risk of developing many types of illness, including dementia. Maintaining a healthy balanced diet and a normal body weight is likely to reduce the chance of developing high blood pressure or heart disease, both of which put a person at greater risk of developing dementia. Avoid those ready meals and many processed foods because they give you too much sugar, bad fats and salt in your diet.

Eating a diet with a high proportion of oily fish, fruit, vegetables, unrefined cereals such as whole-grain bread and olive oil, and low levels of red meat and sweets may help to reduce the risk of dementia. Remember to cut-out the high sugar level drinks as well.

Being Overweight or Obese

Being Overweight or Obese increases someone’s chances of developing risk factors for dementia, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. This means people who are overweight or obese, especially in mid-life (40 to 64), are at an increased risk of developing dementia.

Noting what was said above about Poor Diet and Physical Activity and making those lifestyle changes will help people to avoid becoming overweight or obese and (in most cases) help you to lose weight.

 Mental Activity

Research suggests that people who continual stimulate their brains by reading, learning or doing puzzles are less likely to develop dementia, compared with those who do not engage in these activities. Some research in Sweden showed that early life achievers and those that handled complex data at work had reduced risk of dementia.

Mental activity appears to increase the brain’s ability to cope with, and compensate for, physical damage. By being mentally active your brain can tolerate more damage before symptoms of dementia are detected. Be a life-long learner and take up new hobbies are great ways to challenge your brain and keep it active.

Other areas of risk are:

Depression

Depression is a probable risk in developing dementia. Do not suffer in silence with depression, you should seek help from the GP early because it can be treated, either with drugs or talking therapies (or both).

High blood pressure

High blood pressure in mid-life significantly increases the likelihood of developing dementia in later life. Once you are over the age of 40 you should make sure your blood pressure is checked regularly and follow any medical advice to keep it under control.

Diabetes

The risk of developing dementia has a strong link with having type 2 diabetes. Reduce your chances of developing diabetes by staying at a healthy weight and eating a balanced diet that is low in sugar. If you already have diabetes, it’s important to manage your condition correctly and follow medical advice.

Cholesterol

High cholesterol levels in mid-life have been shown to increase your risk of dementia later on. Cholesterol levels later in life do not seem to have the same effect, but advice seems to change all the time so I would still control it after 65.

If you are the over the age of 40 then get your cholesterol level checked to make sure that you are within a healthy range. Your GP will give you advice on how to reduce your cholesterol if it is too high.

At Everycare, even though we are here to look after people in later life, we want to you all to live as independently and healthily as possible. We recommend you review your lifestyle and adapt it to live a healthy life. We can help by taking on some of the chores you hate doing while you carry on engaging in healthy activities.

Caring for an elderly parent – your 2015 resolutions

Caring for an elderly parent – your 2015 resolutions

Family Care

One of the most difficult things a person can experience is taking care of an elderly parent or relative. Juggling 24-hour care and the needs of your family can place a huge strain on your life. Therefore, to help your elderly relative receive the support they need and provide you with a much-needed break, we have put together a few New Year’s resolutions for you to follow in 2015.

Look after yourself

It is important to remember to look after yourself when you are caring for a relative. They say that prevention is better than cure, so if you feel you are prone to becoming poorly, make appointments for vaccinations, take time to exercise, relax and eat well.

These simple steps will ensure you are not only caring for your well-being but the well-being of your relative.

Attend a Support Group

Caring for a parent can be stressful and cause frustration and worry.
Support groups for carers are held locally and provide you with the opportunity to socialise and share experiences with others who are in similar situations.

www.carers.org
www.carersuk.org
Help at home.
There is nothing wrong with admitting you need support or some respite when caring for a relative. Support with care at home can include assistance with personal care, household tasks or company for your loved one whilst you have a break.

Time is valuable

Being responsible for the care of elderly parents takes time. Be aware of how much time you are spending looking after them. Prioritise tasks so that you don’t find yourself running around in circles, instead of achieving your desired tasks and goals.

Share moments

And finally, have fun with your parents and share moments such as looking at old photographs, sharing old stories and maybe listening to or singing their favorite songs.

Live-in Care in Hampshire

Live-in Care in Hampshire

Home Care

There is one thing you should do when asked to go to a Care Home……

Say No to Care Homes

Everycare (Central Hants) are now doing live-in Care this is a great alternative to going into a Care Home. When someone now mentions a Care Home you can clearly say No! I know a better alternative. How about me staying in my home, with my own things, with the neighbours I know and getting someone to look after me on my own terms.

Live-in Care is a service that give someone on-going care and support in their own home by having someone live with you that is professionally trained.

Live-in care bring s peace of mind because it offers one-to-one care that is personalised and takes place in familiar surroundings. There is no need to go through the upheaval of moving into residential care.

For the service to work properly the Care Worker sleeps in your home so they will need their own room. The service they supply is agreed with you and fully documented so that everyone is clear what service is being supplied.

The Care Worker will give support in the following areas:

  • Companionship – Having someone around, someone to talk to and someone to share meals with, all this can make quite a difference to your wellbeing.
  • Personal Care – included here is help with bathing, showering, toileting, getting dressed and undressed, applying creams and lotions and help with ensuring the correct medications are being taken.
  • Housekeeping – Help with laundry, shopping, cleaning and cooking.

Reasons to favour Live-in Care

  • People value being independent and do not want to leave their own home.
  • It is comforting to stay in familiar surroundings and not have be limited on what can be kept.
  • You can stay with your normal routines and not have to fit in with the requirements of someone else.
  • You may have a pet that you want to keep with you.
  • You do not want anyone else telling you when your family can visit.
  • You want to have a say in who cares for you.
  • There is limited exposure to other people’s illnesses.
  • Costs are comparable with Care Homes.
  • The support given is flexible.

Questions to ask when choosing a Provider

  • Is the the agency Care Quality Commission (CQC) registered, this can be checked by looking on the CQC website www.cqc.org.uk where the latest inspection report can, also, be found. The Agency can supply a copy on request.
  • Are the Care Workers directly employed by the Agency? This avoids worry about tax, NI and pensions.
  • What training is given to the Care Workers? Will I see any proof of this training?
  • What happens when a Care Worker is not able to work due to poor health?
  • What happens if the support and care I am being given needs changing?
  • How is the personal care and support plan drawn up at the start?
  • How are the staff that work for me checked prior to starting work for me?

What should I do next?

You can phone Everycare at any time on

01962 842548

to discuss your requirements. Contact Us.