Maintaining A Healthy And Active Lifestyle


More people are reaching the age of retirement as a nation people are living longer than ever before, the result for the future may mean higher numbers of elderly people with ill health, evidently putting a strain upon care resources and services. Which is why it has never been more important to watch and look after our own health and nutrition in the later stages of life.

As we age our bodies change which may pose a number of challenges as people become less mobile and more frail. In extreme cases some can become malnourished, resulting in low immune systems and an increased percentage of the elderly developing further health issues. Getting older can change our eating habits, sometimes resulting in lack of appetite and motivation when it comes to having a nutritionally balanced meal. The page provided here by Nutritionist Resource gives a number of hints and tips on how to maintain a healthy diet later on in life

One of the best ways to maintain a healthy lifestyle is by following a balanced diet which can be catered towards the individuals specific needs. Qualified nutritionists will be able to identify specific needs and deficiencies which need to be addressed, and will help to formulate a programme for the individual. To find a local nutritionist expert in your area visit Nutritionist Resource:

Our sources of information:

Age UK have some information on Healthy Eating
NHS Eatwell Plate showing a good mix of foods to eat.
Web MD advice on Missing Nutrients those that you may not be getting in your diet.

As for an Active Lifestyle, it is a sad fact that only one in four people between the age of 65 and 74 exercise regularly. There is an assumption that people are too sick, out-of-shape or old to exercise, this is totally wrong.

Exercise is nearly always good for you. Exercise can make you stronger, prevent bones getting weaker, improve your balance and coordination which helps to prevent falls, exercise can also improve your memory and can ease the symptoms of chronic illnesses.

People believe that getting frail as you age is inevitable but getting frail is usually due to not doing any exercise. There are people in their 70’s, 80’s and 90’s running marathons and doing body building. The advice is simple to start doing some exercise and think about getting active.


NHS Exercises for Older People to get you active.
Help guide on Exercise and Fitness as you Age

Does someone you know need support at home in meal preparation?

Would you like a friend or family member to have company whilst out and about in the community?

If you would like to know more about support at home, contact Karen Whitmill at Everycare 01962 842548.

Care in your own Home


Our Care Story.

George and Anna are husband and wife who have been together for 35 years. George met his wife Anna while working as a Headmaster at a primary school.

George and Anna have always been close and when 2 years ago Anna was diagnosed with MS, George did not hesitate in taking on the role of Anna’s full time carer. George had to to give up some of his interests to ensure that he was there for his wife.
George talks about caring for his wife. ‘ I look after my wife with love and compassion. Many families have loved ones with illness or disability and want to care for them in the best way possible . Caring for my wife doesn’t mean that I have to lose my sense of self or not be able to continue with my life.’

‘Anna’s condition has deteriorated with time, when we are together, on our own I give her my full support and care. Friends of the family have had carers visit their home for some time and had spoken highly of the company. I began to realise that I was becoming very tired and would appreciate assistance for morning and evening care. I contacted the company, who arranged to come to our home, speak to Anna about her care, assess her needs and put all the documents in place for the carers. Arrangements for care at home happened very quickly and efficiently which was ideal. Since that has happened, we have had support from carers coming in to our home which is wonderful and we have been very lucky. Anna sees the same carer each morning, in the evenings she sees a couple of carers through the week. I am now retired, but have taken on another position of Mayor which helps to keep me active and healthy for myself and Anna. Anna’s needs have increased , though due to the support from the carers and her husband, she has been able to maintain some independence’.

Anna talked about her care saying ‘ I would not be able to continue living at home if it wasn’t for my husband and the carers who come in on a daily basis. I believe my husband’s health would suffer if we did not have outside help from carers, I was seeing how tired he was getting when trying to cope on his own.’

You may have heard or experienced similar situation to George and Anna.

If you would like to know more about having care in your own home, whether it is for yourself, a friend or family member, contact Karen Whitmill at Everycare 01962 842548.

Think Fast – Safe a Life!



All organs in the body need oxygen, when the supply of blood and nutrients to the brain stops, brain cells die and cause brain injury. A Stroke is caused because the blood supply to part of the brain has stopped

Strokes are a medical emergency and you can save a person’s life if you react FAST.
Treatment is required quickly as this will reduce the amount of damage caused.

Strokes are the third largest cause of death in the UK, after heart disease and Cancer.

There are two different types of Stroke:
Ischaemic – where the blood supply is stopped due to a blood clot.

Haemorrhagic – where a weakened blood vessel supplying the brain bursts

Recognise the symptoms- Remember FAST

FACE: Has the persons face dropped on one side? Can the person smile? Has their mouth or eye dropped?

ARMS: Can the person raise both arms in-front of them and keep them there?

If you suspect a stroke the person may not be able to lift their arms because of weakness or numbness.

SPEECH: Can the person speak?

A stroke may stop a person being able to speak. Speech may be muddled or slurred.

TIME: If you see any of these symptoms, you must call 999.

Further information is available by following the links

Incontinence – What you need to know


What is Urinary Incontinence?

Urinary incontinence causes you to pass urine unintentionally; the amount can vary from very little to a large amount.

How common is Urinary Incontinence?

It’s a topic most people don’t like to discuss, but there’s no need to be embarrassed. Urinary incontinence is more common than you might think! In the UK around three million people are regularly incontinent; this is around one in four adults. This form of incontinence can happen at any age and is especially common in women, affecting one in five over the age of forty.
Statistics for incontinence are likely to be higher in reality as many people do not inform their doctor because of embarrassment.

Stress Incontinence.

This is a common form of incontinence and is caused by pressure on the bladder through weakening pelvic floor muscles. Actions such as coughing, laughing, sneezing and exercises can cause urine to leak, as there is extra pressure on the bladder.
Child birth can cause weakening of pelvic floor muscles. Women who have had several children may experience stress incontinence.
Stress incontinence can also affect men who have had treatment for Prostate Cancer.

Urge Incontinence.

This is the second most common form of incontinence where one experiences the need to pass urine urgently.
Urine sometimes leaks before there is time to reach the toilet. This is caused because the bladder muscle contracts too early and some control is lost. The causes of urge incontinence is unknown.
In many cases, urinary incontinence can be improved or cured. Different types of urinary incontinence have different treatments. Knowing which type of incontinence and the amount of urine leaking will help your doctor to make the correct assessment. He or she may carry out tests or an examination to find out the cause of incontinence. You may be advised to keep a diary for several days, recording how often you go to the toilet, how much urine you pass each time and how often you leak urine.

Incontinence and caring for your skin.

Incontinence can mean that your skin is damp for short periods of time. You can care for your skin and prevent irritability by:

• Using a cotton cloth or wipes to wash. Flannels and sponges can be rough on the skin.

• Products are available that cleanse the skin without the need to dry. These usually come as foams, spray or wipes. Your doctor may also be able to advise on the best option to use.

• Avoid using baby wipes and soaps as this can cause the skin to become dry and irritable.

• After cleansing, always moisturise and use a barrier cream. This forms a protective layer to block out unwanted moisture.

If you’re suffering from this condition, here are some simple lifestyle changes to help:

• Reduce your caffeine intake – caffeine is found in tea, coffee and cola and can increase the amount of urine your body produces.

• Altering how much fluid you drink a day – drinking too much or too little can make incontinence worse.

• If you are overweight or obese – It is helpful to find out if you are a healthy weight for your height.

Further information, take a look at the links below.

Everycare hosts speed dating event for the over 65s

Everycare hosts speed dating event for the over 65s


This March, the team at Everycare hosted a speed dating event for the over 65s at the Discovery Centre in Winchester. We would like to thank all of those who attended and helped to make the event a great success. Local over 65s had the chance to meet new people and form new friendships, whilst enjoying tea, coffee and delicious cakes that were kindly made by our members of staff.

Managing Director, Mike Frizzell, said “On the day, we mixed people around so that they had a good chance to socialise with as many people as possible. As they left they were asking when the next event would be, so I think they enjoyed it!”

We understand the importance of meeting and talking to likeminded people, so it was lovely to have the opportunity to meet you all. We hope to see you again soon!


What is Loneliness


Loneliness happens when people’s need for contact with others is not being met. All of us require some level of interaction with other people, some need more than others.

Being alone is not classed as loneliness, people choose to live by themselves and not have much contact with others. One can still feel lonely when they have family or they are in a relationship.

What causes loneliness?

Different things can cause loneliness and it affects people in different ways.
The lifestyles that people lead, the levels of stress in life can cause people to be less sociable and more prone to becoming isolated or lonely.

• Some Personal Circumstances affecting people

• Loss of a loved one or someone that is close to you.

• Relationship or marriage breakdown

• Retirement- loss of daily contact with colleagues and some social contact

• Difficulty with going out in the community due to mobility.

Being lonely and isolated can affect mental health. Studies have proven that isolation can increase stress levels, cause sleep problems and lower a person’s self-esteem. The combination of all these has a negative impact on well-being. It may be helpful to talk to your GP if you have concerns about loneliness turning into a mental health problem.

Overcoming Loneliness

People can have many friends, but feel they have little connection with the world around them.
When this is the case, gradual social integration will help in becoming more connected with others.

A good first step is to make contact with people through making a call, sending a message through email or text. This can give comfort and reassurance that you do have people around you.

Something small like a walk in the street or garden gives opportunity to say hello to a neighbour or someone you know.

Working parents can connect with others through meeting their children from school.

Ways of meeting people to make friends.

Sharing common interests and experiences with others can be done through different social events.
Attending a church service or event may only be a once a week or monthly event, this is ideal if you are wanting to integrate back in to the community slowly.

Walking groups are likely to be well organised events where people will know each other well. Here you have the choice of talking to people as much or as little as you need.

Many people enjoy the great outdoors and for those gardening is a hobby which they enjoy. You may have a friend who you can spend time with.

These may be:

An Exercise or Walking group

Church Services and Events

Gardening groups
Voluntary Organisations

The Royal Voluntary Services is a voluntary organisation which helps older people to enrich their lives. People can spend time together and share information.

Help prevent elderly falls this winter


Winter is here and snow has recently affected many areas of England. Hospitals have been under immense pressure in all departments, with Accident and Emergency experiencing high levels of elderly admissions.

The smallest fall for an elderly person can have serious consequences, so it is important at this time of year, when the risk of falling is higher, to be proactive in ensuring that the elderly are safe when out in the garden and community.

As the old saying goes, ‘prevention is better than cure’. With falls the biggest cause of hip fractures and accidental death amongst the elderly, we share some simple steps below to help prevent you or your loved one falling this winter.

• Minimise the amount of time outside and keep a close eye on pavements which may become slippery.
• If your elderly relative lives alone, arrange for someone to carefully shovel their steps and walkways.
• If taking a trip outside is vital, make sure you or your family member wear boots with non-skid soles and if they use a cane, replace the rubber tip before it is worn smooth.
• With snow and heavy rain likely during the winter months, water can easily enter the home from shoes, umbrellas and leaks. Therefore, make sure you use slip mats on any surfaces that might become slippery and clean up any spills straight way.

Making sure those really comfortable old slippers are still safe to wear and any carpet or rug edges are not going to cause injury will also help to remain safe at home.

If a fall does occur, it is essential to remain calm. As long as you or your loved one are not hurt, you can get up slowly by getting on to your hands and knees and using steady furniture or a chair to assist you. It is a good idea to rest for a short time afterwards before continuing with the day.

If you’re in a situation where you cannot get up or you are hurt, call for help, bang on the wall or the floor if you’re inside. If you have a life line, you can use this or reach for a phone nearby to call for assistance.

And finally, if you or a loved one needs extra care and support during the winter months, do not hesitate to contact the team here at Evercare on 01962 842548.

Speed dating for the over 65s



Are you looking for laughs and friendship this spring?

If the answer is yes, then head to our speed dating event for over 65s on Wednesday 18th March 2015 at the Winchester Discovery Centre. Meet new people in your community, whilst enjoying some tea, coffee and cake. The event will run from 1-3pm and is completely free.

To book your place head or for more information, contact us on 01962 842548 or email

You can also click here to head to Eventbrite’s website to book your free place.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Companionship-Think about a Pet


For many people companionship can come from a pet and here we look at the benefits pet ownership can bring while remembering the responsibility of owning a pet

How a pet can be the perfect companion

Due to people living longer, health care costs are rising through the treatment of long-term conditions which can affect the older generation. To help tackle this issue, a number of reports, including the ‘Companion Animals and Health of Older Persons’ have looked at the way a cat or dog can help improve physical, mental and social well-being amongst the elderly.

Why a pet is your best companion?

A pet is a companion who is with their owner constantly, being loyal, providing comfort, affection and protection from feelings of loneliness and despair. A cat or dog is the ideal companion as they can help to maintain routine, which is important for people as they get older. Their personality and sense of fun can enhance a person’s routine, bringing laughter and happiness.

Here are just some of the reasons why companionship from a pet can be beneficial to our health:

Physical benefits

Caring for a pet can motivate older people to increase mobility. You can enjoy walks with your dog, play in the garden or simply spend time grooming a cat or dog in your home.

Reduce blood pressure

The physical contact between pets and their owners can have a positive impact on reducing high blood pressure and regulating the heart rate during stressful situations.

Therapy and recovery time

Research has shown that recovery after a hospital visit or illness is often shorter for pet owners. In addition to this, dogs can be trained to detect seizures, as well as help with occupational therapy, speech therapy, or physical rehabilitation.

Feeling loved

Pets such as a dog or cat can give owners company and much affection, making them feel needed and loved, which helps boost their sense of well being.

With all the benefits that having a pet at home can bring, it is important to remember that they need your commitment in providing a home where they will be cared for correctly. Consideration must be made if you are going to be away from home to ensure that your pet is cared for in your absence. And finally, pets can be costly, especially if you have an unexpected visit to the vet. However, with the right planning, care and attention, a pet can make the perfect companion.