Incontinence – What you need to know

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What is Urinary Incontinence?

Urinary incontinence causes you to pass urine unintentionally; the amount can vary from very little to a large amount.

How common is Urinary Incontinence?

It’s a topic most people don’t like to discuss, but there’s no need to be embarrassed. Urinary incontinence is more common than you might think! In the UK around three million people are regularly incontinent; this is around one in four adults. This form of incontinence can happen at any age and is especially common in women, affecting one in five over the age of forty.
Statistics for incontinence are likely to be higher in reality as many people do not inform their doctor because of embarrassment.

Stress Incontinence.

This is a common form of incontinence and is caused by pressure on the bladder through weakening pelvic floor muscles. Actions such as coughing, laughing, sneezing and exercises can cause urine to leak, as there is extra pressure on the bladder.
Child birth can cause weakening of pelvic floor muscles. Women who have had several children may experience stress incontinence.
Stress incontinence can also affect men who have had treatment for Prostate Cancer.

Urge Incontinence.

This is the second most common form of incontinence where one experiences the need to pass urine urgently.
Urine sometimes leaks before there is time to reach the toilet. This is caused because the bladder muscle contracts too early and some control is lost. The causes of urge incontinence is unknown.
In many cases, urinary incontinence can be improved or cured. Different types of urinary incontinence have different treatments. Knowing which type of incontinence and the amount of urine leaking will help your doctor to make the correct assessment. He or she may carry out tests or an examination to find out the cause of incontinence. You may be advised to keep a diary for several days, recording how often you go to the toilet, how much urine you pass each time and how often you leak urine.

Incontinence and caring for your skin.

Incontinence can mean that your skin is damp for short periods of time. You can care for your skin and prevent irritability by:

• Using a cotton cloth or wipes to wash. Flannels and sponges can be rough on the skin.

• Products are available that cleanse the skin without the need to dry. These usually come as foams, spray or wipes. Your doctor may also be able to advise on the best option to use.

• Avoid using baby wipes and soaps as this can cause the skin to become dry and irritable.

• After cleansing, always moisturise and use a barrier cream. This forms a protective layer to block out unwanted moisture.

If you’re suffering from this condition, here are some simple lifestyle changes to help:

• Reduce your caffeine intake – caffeine is found in tea, coffee and cola and can increase the amount of urine your body produces.

• Altering how much fluid you drink a day – drinking too much or too little can make incontinence worse.

• If you are overweight or obese – It is helpful to find out if you are a healthy weight for your height.

Further information, take a look at the links below.

www.ageukincontinence.co.uk/advice/further-information

http://www.bladderandbowelfoundation.org

www.carersuk.org

Everycare hosts speed dating event for the over 65s

Everycare hosts speed dating event for the over 65s

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This March, the team at Everycare hosted a speed dating event for the over 65s at the Discovery Centre in Winchester. We would like to thank all of those who attended and helped to make the event a great success. Local over 65s had the chance to meet new people and form new friendships, whilst enjoying tea, coffee and delicious cakes that were kindly made by our members of staff.

Managing Director, Mike Frizzell, said “On the day, we mixed people around so that they had a good chance to socialise with as many people as possible. As they left they were asking when the next event would be, so I think they enjoyed it!”

We understand the importance of meeting and talking to likeminded people, so it was lovely to have the opportunity to meet you all. We hope to see you again soon!

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What is Loneliness

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Loneliness happens when people’s need for contact with others is not being met. All of us require some level of interaction with other people, some need more than others.

Being alone is not classed as loneliness, people choose to live by themselves and not have much contact with others. One can still feel lonely when they have family or they are in a relationship.

What causes loneliness?

Different things can cause loneliness and it affects people in different ways.
The lifestyles that people lead, the levels of stress in life can cause people to be less sociable and more prone to becoming isolated or lonely.

• Some Personal Circumstances affecting people

• Loss of a loved one or someone that is close to you.

• Relationship or marriage breakdown

• Retirement- loss of daily contact with colleagues and some social contact

• Difficulty with going out in the community due to mobility.

Being lonely and isolated can affect mental health. Studies have proven that isolation can increase stress levels, cause sleep problems and lower a person’s self-esteem. The combination of all these has a negative impact on well-being. It may be helpful to talk to your GP if you have concerns about loneliness turning into a mental health problem.

Overcoming Loneliness

People can have many friends, but feel they have little connection with the world around them.
When this is the case, gradual social integration will help in becoming more connected with others.

A good first step is to make contact with people through making a call, sending a message through email or text. This can give comfort and reassurance that you do have people around you.

Something small like a walk in the street or garden gives opportunity to say hello to a neighbour or someone you know.

Working parents can connect with others through meeting their children from school.

Ways of meeting people to make friends.

Sharing common interests and experiences with others can be done through different social events.
Attending a church service or event may only be a once a week or monthly event, this is ideal if you are wanting to integrate back in to the community slowly.

Walking groups are likely to be well organised events where people will know each other well. Here you have the choice of talking to people as much or as little as you need.

Many people enjoy the great outdoors and for those gardening is a hobby which they enjoy. You may have a friend who you can spend time with.

These may be:
www.campaigntoendloneliness.org

An Exercise or Walking group
www.ramblers.org.uk

Church Services and Events
www.achurchnearyou.com

Gardening groups
www.gardening.meetup.com
Voluntary Organisations

www.royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk

The Royal Voluntary Services is a voluntary organisation which helps older people to enrich their lives. People can spend time together and share information.

Help prevent elderly falls this winter

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Winter is here and snow has recently affected many areas of England. Hospitals have been under immense pressure in all departments, with Accident and Emergency experiencing high levels of elderly admissions.

The smallest fall for an elderly person can have serious consequences, so it is important at this time of year, when the risk of falling is higher, to be proactive in ensuring that the elderly are safe when out in the garden and community.

As the old saying goes, ‘prevention is better than cure’. With falls the biggest cause of hip fractures and accidental death amongst the elderly, we share some simple steps below to help prevent you or your loved one falling this winter.

• Minimise the amount of time outside and keep a close eye on pavements which may become slippery.
• If your elderly relative lives alone, arrange for someone to carefully shovel their steps and walkways.
• If taking a trip outside is vital, make sure you or your family member wear boots with non-skid soles and if they use a cane, replace the rubber tip before it is worn smooth.
• With snow and heavy rain likely during the winter months, water can easily enter the home from shoes, umbrellas and leaks. Therefore, make sure you use slip mats on any surfaces that might become slippery and clean up any spills straight way.

Making sure those really comfortable old slippers are still safe to wear and any carpet or rug edges are not going to cause injury will also help to remain safe at home.

If a fall does occur, it is essential to remain calm. As long as you or your loved one are not hurt, you can get up slowly by getting on to your hands and knees and using steady furniture or a chair to assist you. It is a good idea to rest for a short time afterwards before continuing with the day.

If you’re in a situation where you cannot get up or you are hurt, call for help, bang on the wall or the floor if you’re inside. If you have a life line, you can use this or reach for a phone nearby to call for assistance.

And finally, if you or a loved one needs extra care and support during the winter months, do not hesitate to contact the team here at Evercare on 01962 842548.

Speed dating for the over 65s

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Are you looking for laughs and friendship this spring?

If the answer is yes, then head to our speed dating event for over 65s on Wednesday 18th March 2015 at the Winchester Discovery Centre. Meet new people in your community, whilst enjoying some tea, coffee and cake. The event will run from 1-3pm and is completely free.

To book your place head or for more information, contact us on 01962 842548 or email info@everycarehants.co.uk.

You can also click here to head to Eventbrite’s website to book your free place.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Companionship-Think about a Pet

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For many people companionship can come from a pet and here we look at the benefits pet ownership can bring while remembering the responsibility of owning a pet

How a pet can be the perfect companion

Due to people living longer, health care costs are rising through the treatment of long-term conditions which can affect the older generation. To help tackle this issue, a number of reports, including the ‘Companion Animals and Health of Older Persons’ have looked at the way a cat or dog can help improve physical, mental and social well-being amongst the elderly.

Why a pet is your best companion?

A pet is a companion who is with their owner constantly, being loyal, providing comfort, affection and protection from feelings of loneliness and despair. A cat or dog is the ideal companion as they can help to maintain routine, which is important for people as they get older. Their personality and sense of fun can enhance a person’s routine, bringing laughter and happiness.

Here are just some of the reasons why companionship from a pet can be beneficial to our health:

Physical benefits

Caring for a pet can motivate older people to increase mobility. You can enjoy walks with your dog, play in the garden or simply spend time grooming a cat or dog in your home.

Reduce blood pressure

The physical contact between pets and their owners can have a positive impact on reducing high blood pressure and regulating the heart rate during stressful situations.

Therapy and recovery time

Research has shown that recovery after a hospital visit or illness is often shorter for pet owners. In addition to this, dogs can be trained to detect seizures, as well as help with occupational therapy, speech therapy, or physical rehabilitation.

Feeling loved

Pets such as a dog or cat can give owners company and much affection, making them feel needed and loved, which helps boost their sense of well being.

With all the benefits that having a pet at home can bring, it is important to remember that they need your commitment in providing a home where they will be cared for correctly. Consideration must be made if you are going to be away from home to ensure that your pet is cared for in your absence. And finally, pets can be costly, especially if you have an unexpected visit to the vet. However, with the right planning, care and attention, a pet can make the perfect companion.

Caring for an elderly parent – your 2015 resolutions

Caring for an elderly parent – your 2015 resolutions

Family Care

One of the most difficult things a person can experience is taking care of an elderly parent or relative. Juggling 24-hour care and the needs of your family can place a huge strain on your life. Therefore, to help your elderly relative receive the support they need and provide you with a much-needed break, we have put together a few New Year’s resolutions for you to follow in 2015.

Look after yourself

It is important to remember to look after yourself when you are caring for a relative. They say that prevention is better than cure, so if you feel you are prone to becoming poorly, make appointments for vaccinations, take time to exercise, relax and eat well.

These simple steps will ensure you are not only caring for your well-being but the well-being of your relative.

Attend a Support Group

Caring for a parent can be stressful and cause frustration and worry.
Support groups for carers are held locally and provide you with the opportunity to socialise and share experiences with others who are in similar situations.

www.carers.org
www.carersuk.org
Help at home.
There is nothing wrong with admitting you need support or some respite when caring for a relative. Support with care at home can include assistance with personal care, household tasks or company for your loved one whilst you have a break.

Time is valuable

Being responsible for the care of elderly parents takes time. Be aware of how much time you are spending looking after them. Prioritise tasks so that you don’t find yourself running around in circles, instead of achieving your desired tasks and goals.

Share moments

And finally, have fun with your parents and share moments such as looking at old photographs, sharing old stories and maybe listening to or singing their favorite songs.

Visiting Winchester this Christmas with the elderly

Visiting Winchester this Christmas with the elderly

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Winchester is an attractive city for Christmas shopping, with a selection of specialist retailers. You may find something special for a loved one or treat yourself to a coffee and cake at one of the many cafes and coffee shops.

If you’re planning a shopping visit over the holidays with a friend or family member that requires assistance with mobility, Winchester offers the support you need.


Getting around:

Park and Ride is the best way to get around the city. Car parks are located at St Catherine’s and Barfield, providing a convenient place to leave your car and take one of the buses that run frequently to various stops in the city centre.

The Brooks Shopping Centre offers a variety of popular stores and shop mobility, which is located on the upper level car park. Here you can access scooters and wheelchairs, which will ease the worry of getting around your favourite stores this Christmas.

Attractions:

Winchester is a historic city offering many attractions – Winchester Cathedral, King Alfred’s Round Table and Jane Austin’s house to name but a few. The visitor trail gives you the opportunity to see a number of highlights of Winchester as it is specifically designed for easy access.

The Christmas Market has been recognised as being one of the best in Europe. Pretty wooden chalets, wonderful Christmas gifts, decorations and warm festive food to ease the winter chill.  The market is wheelchair accessible and stewards are available if any assistance is required. The Christmas Market closes this Sunday at 7.30pm.

For more information about attractions and events in Winchester this Christmas, click here.

 

Live-in Care in Hampshire

Live-in Care in Hampshire

Home Care

There is one thing you should do when asked to go to a Care Home……

Say No to Care Homes

Everycare (Central Hants) are now doing live-in Care this is a great alternative to going into a Care Home. When someone now mentions a Care Home you can clearly say No! I know a better alternative. How about me staying in my home, with my own things, with the neighbours I know and getting someone to look after me on my own terms.

Live-in Care is a service that give someone on-going care and support in their own home by having someone live with you that is professionally trained.

Live-in care bring s peace of mind because it offers one-to-one care that is personalised and takes place in familiar surroundings. There is no need to go through the upheaval of moving into residential care.

For the service to work properly the Care Worker sleeps in your home so they will need their own room. The service they supply is agreed with you and fully documented so that everyone is clear what service is being supplied.

The Care Worker will give support in the following areas:

  • Companionship - Having someone around, someone to talk to and someone to share meals with, all this can make quite a difference to your wellbeing.
  • Personal Care - included here is help with bathing, showering, toileting, getting dressed and undressed, applying creams and lotions and help with ensuring the correct medications are being taken.
  • Housekeeping – Help with laundry, shopping, cleaning and cooking.

Reasons to favour Live-in Care

  • People value being independent and do not want to leave their own home.
  • It is comforting to stay in familiar surroundings and not have be limited on what can be kept.
  • You can stay with your normal routines and not have to fit in with the requirements of someone else.
  • You may have a pet that you want to keep with you.
  • You do not want anyone else telling you when your family can visit.
  • You want to have a say in who cares for you.
  • There is limited exposure to other people’s illnesses.
  • Costs are comparable with Care Homes.
  • The support given is flexible.

Questions to ask when choosing a Provider

  • Is the the agency Care Quality Commission (CQC) registered, this can be checked by looking on the CQC website www.cqc.org.uk where the latest inspection report can, also, be found. The Agency can supply a copy on request.
  • Are the Care Workers directly employed by the Agency? This avoids worry about tax, NI and pensions.
  • What training is given to the Care Workers? Will I see any proof of this training?
  • What happens when a Care Worker is not able to work due to poor health?
  • What happens if the support and care I am being given needs changing?
  • How is the personal care and support plan drawn up at the start?
  • How are the staff that work for me checked prior to starting work for me?

What should I do next?

You can phone Everycare at any time on

01962 842548

to discuss your requirements. Contact Us.